Notes for my writing

This blog is made up of notes on the gospel as found in the only true and living church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This includes notes that are either excerpts from or ideas for books I either have in draft or may yet write.

Monday, December 14, 2015

Wherefore are we not afraid to correct his servant Moses?

There is something tragic in our unrelenting desire to cling to our traditions.

We have not spoken with God in person. I feel safe in saying that those reading this have, like myself, not so much as spoken with angels or heard God's voice speaking to us except through the whisperings of the Holy Ghost. We see him through a glass darkly.

Then you take a man like Moses. He was a prophet among prophets, the head of a dispensation. When Aaron and Miriam criticize Moses God speaks to them:

Numbers 12:6 And he said, Hear now my words: If there be a prophet among you, I the Lord will make myself known unto him in a vision, and will speak unto him in a dream.
7 My servant Moses is not so, who is faithful in all mine house.
8 With him will I speak mouth to mouth, even apparently, and not in dark speeches; and the similitude of the Lord shall he behold: wherefore then were ye not afraid to speak against my servant Moses?
9 And the anger of the Lord was kindled against them; and he departed.

The Lord points out that "If there be a prophet among you, I the Lord will make myself known unto him in a vision, and will speak unto him in a dream", but adds that "My servant Moses is not so, who is faithful in all mine house. With him will I speak mouth to mouth," The Lord concludes "wherefore then were ye not afraid to speak against my servant Moses?"

One might just as well ask "wherefore are we not afraid to not correct his servant Moses"?

When Moses says (as he does in this account) that the anger of the Lord was kindled, we think he doesn't know what he is talking about. We interrupt and throw in our traditions. When Moses says  "For I was afraid of the anger and hot displeasure, wherewith the Lord was wroth against you to destroy you." (Dueteronomy 9:19) or any of many similar statements we interject corrections. Surely Christ would never be angry, we say. Surely he is not wroth, we say.

Where do we, who see God through a glass darkly, come off correcting the man who was speaking with him face to face about whether God was angry, was wroth, and was going to destroy a people in his fierce displeasure.

I think it is ironic that we know God will send men to hell, but we think that he is only ever a gentle lamb.

Moses 6:29 Wherefore, they have foresworn themselves, and, by their oaths, they have brought upon themselves death; and a hell I have prepared for them, if they repent not;

I am not trying to say those are the only ways the Lord God ever acts. But anyone who reads the scriptures should stop disbelieving the words of the person standing right there in God's presence watching events unfold and speaking with God at the time who tells us of the fury the Lord felt, and speaks of the Lord destroying people in wrath and hot displeasure.

Wherefore are we not afraid to correct his servant Moses?

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